I was born in Amsterdam but raised in Ibiza. I studied music theory and guitar from a young age but suffered from terrible stage fright at my first-ever performance and decided to quit shortly after. I was that kid at school that always had his earphones on listening to music rather than talking to other students. In my early teens, I became obsessed with DJing, and by the time I was 13, I had saved up enough money doing odd jobs for our neighbors to be able to buy my first pair of belt drive “Acoustic Control” turntables. DJing became an obsession and it was my re-entry into music, and for some strange reason, I no longer had stage fright.

The attack setting you use for mix buss compression is just as important as using a compressor on any other individual track. With a faster attack, the compressor will clamp down sooner on the transients that tend to be a little louder than the rest of the audio coming through. A slower attack will wait milliseconds before it clamps down on the audio and starts compressing.

Knowing your audience is a crucial aspect of marketing your music, but it is also important to consider your audience when writing your music. What kind of people (outside of your friends and family) do you want your music to appeal to? What artists do people in your target audience listen to? Which moods and lyrics does your audience relate to?

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Now you can begin working on the next step in your journey towards building a sustainable fan base away from your hometown – figuring out how to maintain this following when it might be a little while before you can come play live for them again.

Want to increase your band’s chances of getting booked? Try putting yourself in the shoes of venues, show promoters, and festival curators. Music making is too often an introverted, navel-gazing pursuit on the part of the artist, and a great deal of us work incredibly hard to make music and share it with the world, only to struggle in finding any tangible booking success.

“Finesse” (Remix): Cardi B drops herself into this remix in a relatively extended intro. There’s also a pre-chorus, as well as a fake-out bridge which I’m going to call a “pre-bridge” (P2). My favorite part of this section, this song, and maybe this entire study in general, is that just when you think the whole thing is going to be done over the three-chord loop of♭VI  V  i, they throw in a ♭vii to ♭III turnaround, or, for the functionally minded, a “ii  V  I” that resolves back to D♭. This tonal trick, as well as the extensions and voicings, are really typical of the era they’re harkening back to in the video. Super clever.

His yodeling obsession was accompanied by a love of obscure stringed instruments like the zither and hammered dulcimer, both of which he taught himself as a child. In his teens, Ischi taught himself to yodel by listening to Franzl Lang records and imitating what he heard. In case you aren’t familiar, Lang is one of yodeling’s most revered figures and is widely known as the “Yodel King.”

One of the best things you can do as a working producer is to analyze music by the artists who inspire you. This will help you understand how they build their tracks, and develop their ideas for when you start working on how things are arranged and orchestrated.

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Its influence can be heard across all sorts delay effects and pedals today. The combination of reverb and tone controls to the echo/delay is an almost universal feature now and yet the sound design always seems reminiscent of the RE-201. The earlier delay devices are often seen as collector’s items, but because of how difficult they are to use and how fragile they are it’s rare to see a working one in someone studio.

Whatever state the track is in, what will take it to the next level? If it’s a complete mess, what steps might begin to pull it together? If it’s a good idea that’s poorly executed, how could it be smoothed out? If it’s a promising fragment, how could it be developed into a full thought? If it’s a complete and polished track, could it have lyrics, or another section, or an alternative arrangement?

Do you have a two-minute number that somehow feels like it’s dragging on without going anywhere? Maybe you need to add a bridge. Does the move from your verse to your chorus feel overly sudden, leaving things disjointed? Consider using a pre-chorus to ease that transition. Do you want a place for the audience to clap along? Sometimes doubling up the last chorus can accomplish that nicely.

Yoshino composes and arranges pop-influenced originals, interspersed with her own arrangements of jazz standards. A classically trained pianist, her arrangements move in ecstatic fits and starts, holding the room with brief moments of tension before bursting into glorious runs on piano, bass, and saxophone.

Planning your next cross-country tour? Here are 8 cities where you’re guaranteed a great, youthful, and excited audience, and a variety of spaces to boot.

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